inversion1 sketch copy1.png
       
     
  (in)version 1.0 is the first in a series that makes use of the iterative property of slip casting. The series was developed during a 10-week introduction to slip casting course at the Steel Yard. 
       
     
  I wanted to take advantage of the translucent property that porcelain has when cast thin. A thinner casting time allows light to emanate from the form. 
       
     
  The form was inspired by pendant lighting, however, instead of suspension, the lighting sits directly on the surface. 
       
     
  In order to create the form, I used an Erlenmeyer flask (from my days studying to be a biologist), building up the original base to achieve a kinetic conical form.
       
     
inversion1 sketch copy1.png
       
     
  (in)version 1.0 is the first in a series that makes use of the iterative property of slip casting. The series was developed during a 10-week introduction to slip casting course at the Steel Yard. 
       
     

(in)version 1.0 is the first in a series that makes use of the iterative property of slip casting. The series was developed during a 10-week introduction to slip casting course at the Steel Yard. 

  I wanted to take advantage of the translucent property that porcelain has when cast thin. A thinner casting time allows light to emanate from the form. 
       
     

I wanted to take advantage of the translucent property that porcelain has when cast thin. A thinner casting time allows light to emanate from the form. 

  The form was inspired by pendant lighting, however, instead of suspension, the lighting sits directly on the surface. 
       
     

The form was inspired by pendant lighting, however, instead of suspension, the lighting sits directly on the surface. 

  In order to create the form, I used an Erlenmeyer flask (from my days studying to be a biologist), building up the original base to achieve a kinetic conical form.
       
     

In order to create the form, I used an Erlenmeyer flask (from my days studying to be a biologist), building up the original base to achieve a kinetic conical form.